Avoid these site structure mistakes!

Andrew Raynor

 

 

If you take your SEO – and users – seriously, you’ll be working on a kick-ass site structure. Setting up a decent site structure is rather hard. Maintaining a solid site structure if your site is growing is even harder. Mistakes are easily made. In this post, I will share 5 common site structure mistakes people often make. Make sure to avoid all of these! 

Learn how to structure your site well with our Site structure training! »

Site structure training$ 99 – Buy now » Info

#1 Hiding your cornerstones

Your most important articles – your cornerstones – should not be hidden away. Cornerstone articles are the articles that your most proud of, that most clearly reflect the mission of your website. Some people forget to link to their most precious articles. If an article receives no or few internal links, search engines will find it less easily (as search engines follow links). Google will regard articles with few internal links as less important, and rank them accordingly.

Solution: link to those cornerstones

Ideally, you should be able to navigate to your cornerstone articles in one or two clicks from the homepage. Make sure they’re visible for your visitors, so people can easily find them.

Most importantly, link to those cornerstone articles. Don’t forget to mention them in your other blog posts! Our internal linking tool can really help you to remember your cornerstones at all times!

#2 No breadcrumbs

Breadcrumbs are important for both the user experience and the SEO of your website. And yet, some people do not use them. Breadcrumbs show how the current page fits into the structure of your site, which allows your users to easily navigate your site. They also allow search engines to determine the structure of your site without difficulty.

Solution: add those breadcrumbs

No excuses here! Just add those breadcrumbs. Yoast SEO can help you do that!

#3 HUGE categories

Categories should be relatively similar in size. But without even noticing it, people will sometimes write about one subject much more than about another. As a result, one category can slowly grow much larger than other categories. When one category is significantly larger than other ones, your site becomes unbalanced. You’ll have a hard time ranking with blog posts within a very large category.

Solution: split categories

If you’ve created a huge category, split it in two (or three). You should check the size of your categories every now and then, especially if you write a lot of blog posts.

#4 Using too many tags

Don’t create too many tags. Some people want to make tags really specific. But if every post receives yet another new unique tag, you are not structuring anything, because posts don’t become grouped or linked. So that’s pretty much useless.

Solution: use tags in moderation

Make sure that tags are used more than once or twice and that tags group articles together that really belong together. You should also ensure that your tags are in fact available to your visitors somewhere, preferably at the bottom of your article. Tags are useful for your visitors (and not just for Google) to read more about the same topic.

Read more: ‘Using category and tag pages for SEO’ »

#5 Not visualizing your site structure

A final site structure mistake people make is forgetting to visualize the site structure. Visitors want to be able to find stuff on your website with ease. The main categories of your blog should all have a place in the menu on your homepage. But don’t create too many categories, or your menu will get cluttered. A menu should give a clear overview and reflect the structure of your site. Ideally, the menu helps visitors understand how your website is structured.

Solution: dive into UX

In order to create a good and clear overview of your site, you should really dive into some aspects of User eXperience (UX). Think about what your visitors are looking for and how you could help them to navigate through your website. You could, for instance, start with reading our blog posts about User eXperience (UX).

Fix your site structure mistakes!

Site structure is an essential aspect of an SEO strategy. The structure of your website shows Google what articles and pages are most important. With your site’s structure, you can influence which articles will rank highest in the search engine. So, it’s important to do it right. Especially if you’re adding a lot of content, the structure of your site could be changing quickly. Try to stay on top!

Did we forget a site structure mistake that you encounter often? Please share it with us in the comments!

Keep reading: ‘Site structure: the ultimate guide’ »

SEO New Hampshire

https://twitter.com/andrewraynornh

 

https://plus.google.com/101481704883230173242/

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqysZhClqGBvHY0biNlwfFw

 

https://www.pinterest.com/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.facebook.com/Andrew-Raynor-1694677947484186

 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewraynornh

 

https://about.me/andrewraynor

 

https://myspace.com/andrewraynor

 

https://vimeo.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.crunchbase.com/person/andrew-raynor

 

https://www.reddit.com/user/andrewraynor/

 

https://medium.com/@AndrewRaynor

 

http://andrewraynor.blogspot.com/

 

https://andrewraynoroh.wordpress.com/

 

http://andrewraynor.tumblr.com/

 

https://app.bitly.com/bitlinks/?actions=accountMain

 

https://delicious.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.diigo.com/profile/andrewraynor

 

https://digg.com/u/andrewraynor

 

http://www.folkd.com/user/andrewraynor

 

https://www.instapaper.com/p/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.linkagogo.com/go/Page

 

http://andrewraynor.livejournal.com/

 

https://sites.google.com/site/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.plurk.com/andrewraynor

 

https://getpocket.com/@94aT9A0lg3650p0345d8b95djtpzg653794mvKrd3fT792f3733d9Yf3eHbmYib8

 

http://www.dailymotion.com/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/andrewraynor

 

https://disqus.com/by/andrew_raynor/

 

https://www.readability.com/andrewraynor/

Coming soon: Structured data training!

Andrew Raynor

 

 

Do you want to increase chances people click on your page in the search results? Want to learn how to get those awesome rich snippets? Next week, we’ll launch our Structured data training. In this new training, you’ll learn how structured data can influence the appearance of your pages in the search results. After completing this course, you’ll be able to add structured data yourself, so Google can show a rich snippet.

Why take our structured data training?

A normal snippet of a recipe looks like this:

You see a title, a URL and a description of a page. If you add structured data to your page, Google (or another search engine) can transform your snippet into this:

So the structured data you add can show up in the snippet. For recipes you can add ratings and reviews, cooking time, calories and an awesome picture. Not only for recipes, but also for books, movies, articles, products etc. structured data exists.

Rich snippets let your page stand out from the other search results in Google. And if your page stands out in the search results, chances are much higher people will click on it.

Is adding structured data hard?

Adding structured data is not very hard, but you do need to know what you’re doing. After some training, everyone should be able to add structured data and get rewarded with those desired rich snippets!

We’ve created a very practical online training in which we take you through all the steps of adding structured data to a site. We’ll first explain the theory and then we’ll show you screencasts that will guide you through the steps you need to take. We’ll discuss multiple strategies you can use to add structured data to a website. Some strategies are more advanced (and more daunting) than others. At the end of the course, you’ll be able to add structured data in multiple ways. Just choose which strategy fits you best and start working on those awesome rich snippets yourself!

Want to buy our course?

The structured data training will be available as of June 29. You can purchase the course for the introductory price of $119 until July 2. You’ll get access to over 75 minutes of training videos, lots and lots of reading material and challenging quiz questions. If you finish our course, you’ll receive a certificate and a badge to put on your site. If you buy one of our courses, you’ll also get access to the Yoast Updates. These updates keep you in the loop about new trends in SEO and WordPress every 3 months.

Want to know more?

Check out the Structured data training and make sure you won’t miss the launch by subscribing to our newsletter!

Not the right training for you? We offer lots of other SEO courses. See which one fits your needs best!

SEO New Hampshire

https://twitter.com/andrewraynornh

 

https://plus.google.com/101481704883230173242/

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqysZhClqGBvHY0biNlwfFw

 

https://www.pinterest.com/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.facebook.com/Andrew-Raynor-1694677947484186

 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewraynornh

 

https://about.me/andrewraynor

 

https://myspace.com/andrewraynor

 

https://vimeo.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.crunchbase.com/person/andrew-raynor

 

https://www.reddit.com/user/andrewraynor/

 

https://medium.com/@AndrewRaynor

 

http://andrewraynor.blogspot.com/

 

https://andrewraynoroh.wordpress.com/

 

http://andrewraynor.tumblr.com/

 

https://app.bitly.com/bitlinks/?actions=accountMain

 

https://delicious.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.diigo.com/profile/andrewraynor

 

https://digg.com/u/andrewraynor

 

http://www.folkd.com/user/andrewraynor

 

https://www.instapaper.com/p/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.linkagogo.com/go/Page

 

http://andrewraynor.livejournal.com/

 

https://sites.google.com/site/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.plurk.com/andrewraynor

 

https://getpocket.com/@94aT9A0lg3650p0345d8b95djtpzg653794mvKrd3fT792f3733d9Yf3eHbmYib8

 

http://www.dailymotion.com/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/andrewraynor

 

https://disqus.com/by/andrew_raynor/

 

https://www.readability.com/andrewraynor/

Google Search Console and structured data

Andrew Raynor

 

 

Google Search Console is an incredibly important tool for website owners. This tool shows you how your site appears in the Google search results. It also shows you what to improve to make the most of your listings in the results. One of the many cool features of Search Console is the structured data analyses found in the Search Appearance section. Let’s dive into that!

Optimize your site for search & social media and keep it optimized with Yoast SEO Premium »

Yoast SEO for WordPress pluginBuy now » Info

In this post, we’ll cover the Structured data tab in GSC, the Rich Cards tab and the Data Highlighter. If you don’t have Search Console yet – and you really should -, sign up on Google’s website.

Google search console home

Search Appearance

First, log into Search Console. On the left-hand side of your screen, you’ll find the Search Appearance menu item. This tool gives you insights into how your website appears in the search results. You can click any item to see how Google treats your site.

Structured Data

In this post, our main focal point is structured data, so we’ll jump to the Structured Data section of GSC. Clicking on Structured Data will show you an overview of all the pages that have some kind of structured data attached to it. This could be in any form, like RDFa or Microdata, but usually, it will be in JSON-LD.

Structured data is all the extra information you give search engines to understand what a page is about. For instance, as the writer of this article, I am both a Person and an Author. If I add this data to the source code of this page, search engines can use that data to do cool things. If you sell products, you can enhance your search listings with reviews and ratings, prices and availability. These might all become visible in the search results.

Rich snippets products

Google Search Console shows a red line for the pages on your site that have incorrectly implemented structured data. Red indicate items with errors. You’ll notice that Search Console automatically sorts the list by the number of errors on a page. This way, you can start by fixing the most important issues first.

Google search console graph

Click on the lines in the table to see which pages have errors with the selected data type. Use these errors to prioritize your work. The big graph shows the progression of your structured data implementation as seen by Google. Let’s see how that works.

We’re going to take a closer look at the data. Above the graph, we see how many structured data items Google has found on how many pages, in this case, 218 items on 56 pages. Look closely at the left and right-hand side of the graph. The left side – in blue – goes from zero to 240 and this shows the number of pages with structured data items. The right side – in red – goes from zero to sixteen and shows the number of errors. At the bottom of the image, you see all the different data types Google has found on your site and all the items that have errors.

Errors

Now that we’ve analyzed all the different data on the structured data tab, it’s time to look at our errors. So click on an item with errors.

Google search console errors

After clicking on an error you’ll see this screen. This is where all the errors are listed individually. It’s the same kind of information as the screen before this one, so I won’t cover it again. However, now click on the individual error to see what happens:

Google search console popup

When we clicked on the individual error, a pop-up appeared. It shows information of the domain we’re on, information about the data item that gives an error and a button to test it with the Structured Data Testing Tool. Try to test with live data because GSC might give you an incorrect message. Also, the Structured Data Testing Tool allows you to tweak the code until it doesn’t give an error anymore. This way, you can safely test and improve on the error. Let’s move on to Rich Cards.

Rich Cards

Rich cards are new ways of presenting search results. These results are often amended with special, rich search features that make the results more interactive. For instance, a recipe site might get swipeable cards in the search results or a restaurant might get an option to immediately reserve a seat from the results. These are just a couple of examples. And since this is one of the areas Google is increasingly focussing on, you’ll see a lot more of these in the coming years.

Rich cards aren’t that different from structured data types. You can see structured data as the language used to describe the content on a page, while a rich card is a visually compelling way to present search results. And yes, more often than not, rich cards rely on the structured data that Google finds on a page. That’s why the Rich Cards tab is kind of complementary to the Structured Data tab instead of it superseding it. 

By the way, these are all the rich cards Google creates.

Add structured data to your site, validate it and you’re ready to get rich cards. If Google deems your site the best possible result, that is. In Search Appearance, you can check if your implementation is correct and if Google has already awarded you rich cards.

Google search console rich cards overview

Click on the Rich Cards tab and you’ll see a graph like the one above. On top of the graph, you can tick and untick the boxes. We’ve got invalid cards, cards that can be improved and correct cards. You can probably guess that each box shows a different graph. Also, our issues are sorted by severity. First, we’ll try and find out what our critical issues are by clicking on them.

Google search console rich cards

Now we see all the individual URLs with errors. We know that these are all image-related problems because that’s mentioned in the previous screenshot. Just click on one of the URLs.

Google search console cards popup

A pop-up will appear, similar to the one in the Structured Data tab. It gives you the option to test your live data and read the card documentation. You always want to double check your live data with the Structured Data Testing Tool. As said before, you can edit the code right away and see whether your changes validate. All good now? Great, you can start to implement your new code.

Data Highlighter

The Data Highlighter is a tool within GSC that allows you to markup your pages without any knowledge of coding. There are a couple of things you need to know before you start marking up your structured data with Google’s Data Highlighter. Firstly, your highlighted data is stored in Google’s databases, not on your site itself. Since the data is stored externally from your site, other search engines won’t be able to benefit from it. Ask yourself if you want this. Secondly, Data Highlighter only offers a limited set of schema you can implement. So it won’t be for everyone.

The Data Highlighter does make fixing the issues you’ve found in the Structured Data section easier. For instance, choose one of the URLs that had a faulty Structured Data setup and tell GSC what kind of information you want to highlight.

This will bring you to a live view of that page and you’ll be able to select any element on the page. By selecting an element you’ll be given a choice of what you want to highlight that specific element for. For example, for a Product, you’ll be given these markups to add to the corresponding element on the page:

google search console data highlighter

This makes adding Structured Data, for Google at least, as easy as a few clicks.

You can find the Data Highlighter under the Search Appearance section. Click on the “Start highlighting” button and you’ll see a new screen. Now we can fill in the URL (a product page, for example), select the type of markup we’d like to implement (Product Schema.org) and select if we just want to markup this single page or similar pages like it as well. We’ll only show multiple pages because marking up single pages shares the same core functionalities – only with fewer steps.

You can easily select elements on a page. Google automatically shows the available Schema.org you can select, see the first arrow. Once selected, you’ll see an overview of the data items on that page, check the second arrow. When you’re done, you click on finished – it’s the big red button in the top right corner.

google search console data highlighter save

In the end, Google shows you random pages from your selection to check the implementation. You can verify whether the information holds true for all of your products:

● Did Google unexpectedly include a page it shouldn’t have? Click Remove page.
● Did Google mistakenly apply the wrong Schema? You can correct it by selecting the element and change the Schema.
● Did Google do it right? Just click Next.

The Google Data Highlighter is just one of the tools that helps you implement structured data with Schema.org. It is, however, fully tied into the Google ecosystem and might not be the best option when you want to keep full control over your data.

You’ve reached the end…

Structured data gives you an excellent opportunity to open a conversation with search engines. By adding structured data, you make your site instantly comprehensible for engines. This way, they can use your data to present your content in innovative, highly visible ways that are guaranteed to catch the eye of your customers or readers.

Structured data is becoming so important that we’ve developed a course to educate you on this subject. In this course, we’ll show you exactly what structured data encompasses, what it can do, how to implement it using JSON-LD and Google Tag Manager, and how to check its performance in Google Search Console. This course will be available from June 29.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this article! Keep an eye on yoast.com for more articles on structured data and SEO. And don’t forget to sign up for our brand new Structured data course!

Read more: ‘Structured data with Schema.org: the ultimate guide’ »

SEO New Hampshire

https://twitter.com/andrewraynornh

 

https://plus.google.com/101481704883230173242/

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqysZhClqGBvHY0biNlwfFw

 

https://www.pinterest.com/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.facebook.com/Andrew-Raynor-1694677947484186

 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewraynornh

 

https://about.me/andrewraynor

 

https://myspace.com/andrewraynor

 

https://vimeo.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.crunchbase.com/person/andrew-raynor

 

https://www.reddit.com/user/andrewraynor/

 

https://medium.com/@AndrewRaynor

 

http://andrewraynor.blogspot.com/

 

https://andrewraynoroh.wordpress.com/

 

http://andrewraynor.tumblr.com/

 

https://app.bitly.com/bitlinks/?actions=accountMain

 

https://delicious.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.diigo.com/profile/andrewraynor

 

https://digg.com/u/andrewraynor

 

http://www.folkd.com/user/andrewraynor

 

https://www.instapaper.com/p/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.linkagogo.com/go/Page

 

http://andrewraynor.livejournal.com/

 

https://sites.google.com/site/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.plurk.com/andrewraynor

 

https://getpocket.com/@94aT9A0lg3650p0345d8b95djtpzg653794mvKrd3fT792f3733d9Yf3eHbmYib8

 

http://www.dailymotion.com/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/andrewraynor

 

https://disqus.com/by/andrew_raynor/

 

https://www.readability.com/andrewraynor/

Why there’s only one model: the open source model

Andrew Raynor

 

 

WordPress was built by the community. In just a few incredibly productive years, it grew to become the most popular CMS in the world, and all of us in the WordPress Community played a role in the evolution and development of WordPress. Together, we made it into the popular powerhouse it is today. If there was one thing that made it possible, it was the open source philosophy. Just like WordPress, Yoast was born from an open source world. In this interview, Joost de Valk shares his views on a topic dear to his heart.

Joost began his journey into the open source world many moons ago. As a contributor to the WebKit project, which built a layout engine for web browsers, he saw how a group of like-minded people could go up against mainstream, rich companies. WebKit’s small team made waves with their product. Different browsers adopted it and it helped them to hold their own against the incredible power of Internet Explorer. Joost says: “We were unbelievably efficient. I discovered very early on that it was better to build something together than on your own.” 

New to SEO? Learn the Basics of SEO in our Basic SEO course »

Basic SEO training$ 199 – Buy now » Info

A passion for open source

Talk to Joost about open source and his eyes light up. Open source formed him – it shaped his thoughts and visions. Even now, as CEO of a successful company, he’d still choose open source as the business model every time. Joost: “If I had to start over, I’d do a million things differently. But I would choose open source again in a heartbeat. I actually do think it’s better to create together. Take those design agencies that develop bespoke CMS’s. Why? It’s nonsense. It leads to vendor lock-in and that is horrible. There’s only one model: the open source model.”

‘‘If I had to start over, I would choose open source again in a heartbeat ’’

Running a business with an open source mindset is better than keeping everything behind closed doors. Joost: “Why should a school build their own site when there are hundreds of schools with the same requirements and questions? Join hands to make it manageable and cheaper. Just think how much the government could save if they used open source everywhere.”

“To me,” says Joost, “open source is a combination of community, not just friends, and a shared responsibility to find solutions to problems together. Take WordPress for example, collectively we are fixing the problem of publishing to the web. Other projects tackle different problems in the same way, together. This is how society should function; when we set our minds to it, we can achieve anything if we combine our efforts.”

David vs. Goliath

Joost sees open source as a David vs. Goliath struggle: “It’s money versus community. A lot of money versus no money. As a community-driven CMS, WordPress continuously has to figure out how to go up against large-scale commercial efforts. But, in spite of all that money, WordPress continues to grow like wildfire. We’ve reached critical mass and it will only go up from here.”

While WordPress grows, its community continues to expand. According to Joost, the community is diversifying at a rapid rate: “It’s not just developers anymore – the project attracts a wide range of people, from designers to writers. People are willing to invest loads of time into it. Just look at all those WordCamps around the world; all of them are organized by people from all walks of life.”

Open source politics

In theory, open source may sound like the perfect way to get something done, but oftentimes, good-old politics can cause everything to grind to a halt. “The political games are no fun,” Joost says. “It’s a community and therefore pretty diffuse. It takes time to reach a consensus. It’s hard to navigate the waters when there’s no one actually in charge. You have to figure out where decisions are being made and try to be there to influence them. That’s when you find out that not having anyone in charge can make it harder.”

‘‘It takes a lot of time and effort to develop a tool like Yoast SEO’’

Yoast now and in the future

Yoast as a company was built on open source and this philosophy continues to play a big part in its future plans. The Yoast SEO plugin is now spreading its wings, moving to other open source platforms like Drupal, TYPO3 and Magento. But Yoast has to sell something to make money, so in our case it’s a Premium version and other products, like services and education – aspects Joost wants to expand: “In the future, I’d love to be able to give away my plugins for free and generate enough income from our services and education platform. But, that moment is not yet in sight.”

Making money on open source seems strange and contradictory to the openness of open source. Yet, to pay nothing towards the development of products you use every day feels wrong as well. Joost: “It’s almost as if people think it’s rather easy to develop something for WordPress and that it doesn’t cost anything. That’s not true of course. It takes a lot of time and effort to develop a tool like Yoast SEO. Think about it, the readability analysis in Yoast SEO took about six man-years to develop. We could have put it in the Premium version, but we thought about the impact it would have if we gave it away for free. So we did. Come to think of it, I’ve never thought about taking something out of the free version of Yoast SEO to make people pay for it.”

Read more: ‘Yoast WordPress core contributions ’ »

SEO New Hampshire

https://twitter.com/andrewraynornh

 

https://plus.google.com/101481704883230173242/

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqysZhClqGBvHY0biNlwfFw

 

https://www.pinterest.com/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.facebook.com/Andrew-Raynor-1694677947484186

 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewraynornh

 

https://about.me/andrewraynor

 

https://myspace.com/andrewraynor

 

https://vimeo.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.crunchbase.com/person/andrew-raynor

 

https://www.reddit.com/user/andrewraynor/

 

https://medium.com/@AndrewRaynor

 

http://andrewraynor.blogspot.com/

 

https://andrewraynoroh.wordpress.com/

 

http://andrewraynor.tumblr.com/

 

https://app.bitly.com/bitlinks/?actions=accountMain

 

https://delicious.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.diigo.com/profile/andrewraynor

 

https://digg.com/u/andrewraynor

 

http://www.folkd.com/user/andrewraynor

 

https://www.instapaper.com/p/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.linkagogo.com/go/Page

 

http://andrewraynor.livejournal.com/

 

https://sites.google.com/site/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.plurk.com/andrewraynor

 

https://getpocket.com/@94aT9A0lg3650p0345d8b95djtpzg653794mvKrd3fT792f3733d9Yf3eHbmYib8

 

http://www.dailymotion.com/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/andrewraynor

 

https://disqus.com/by/andrew_raynor/

 

https://www.readability.com/andrewraynor/

156: Avoid the Ravenous Monster of the Bestseller Game: Interview with Elizabeth Marshall

Andrew Raynor

It’s becoming increasingly apparent that traditional publishing and hitting the bestseller lists is a game. You don’t write a bestseller so much as you launch one. And yet, for those who want their work to endure, the question hangs in the air: is the game worth playing?

156: Avoid the Ravenous Monster of the Bestseller Game: Interview with Elizabeth Marshall

As a writer and five-time author, I’d be lying if I told you that hitting the Wall Street Journal bestseller list twice meant nothing to me. Honestly, it feels good.

But you know what?

The two books that hit the list were released very differently.

With the latest title, Real Artists Don’t Starve, I was mostly hands off during launch week while the first book, The Art of Work, I was relentless in knocking on as many doors as possible to ensure it’s success.

Two different books. Two different launches. Two opposite stress levels.

Same result.

This week on The Portfolio Life, author and platform consultant, Elizabeth Marshall, and I talk about key differences between an expert and a thought leader, paths to mastery, and avoiding the allure of bestseller lists in exchange for an enduring message.

Listen in as we discuss the stages of a thought leader, why your message doesn’t always translate across all mediums, and how opportunities lead to more opportunities.

Listen to the podcast

To listen to the show, click the player below (If you’re reading this via email, please click here).

Show highlights

In this episode, Elizabeth and I discuss:

  • Exploring what it is you’re uniquely called to share
  • Why knowing the “bookshelf” your work belongs on provides necessary clarity
  • Challenges of translating workshop principles to book form
  • Developing habits of consistency and ubiquity
  • The value of creating a content strategy
  • 10 different elements of a platform
  • Knowing when to say “no” to enticing offers that don’t align with your purpose and vision
  • What it takes to become a recognized leader in certain industries
  • Keeping the message relevant and maintaining fresh connections across your platform
  • Reaching the stage of unconscious competence
  • The “charge neutral” nature of marketing tools and best practices
  • Why chasing a badge of success is an insatiable monster

Quotes and takeaways

  • Finding your purpose is more of a path than a plan.
  • “Becoming a thought leader is not for the faint of heart.” –Elizabeth Marshall
  • You have some control over whether your not your ideas and message endure.
  • “There is no cookie cutter blueprint that guarantees you’ll be recognized as a thought leader in your industry.” –Elizabeth Marshall
  • If you don’t know what stage you’re at, you can misapply strategies or try things that you and your audience aren’t ready for.
  • “Messages have a path of their own. If we’re not listening and open, we might miss some of the greatest trajectories it might take us towards.” –Elizabeth Marshall
  • If you feel like your message is for everyone, you need to spend more time incubating it.
  • Be grateful for the opportunities you’re given. No matter how small.
  • Be present in the moment and make the most of it.
  • The best relationships are not based on transactions.
  • Becoming a New York Times bestseller doesn’t happen by accident.

Resources

Click here to download a free PDF of the complete interview transcript.

Do you consider yourself a thought leader? What stage are you at? Share in the comments

Andrew Raynor

What is an XML sitemap and why should you have one?

Andrew Raynor

 

 

A good XML sitemap is a roadmap to all important pages of a website. This roadmap guides Google to all main content on a website. Having an XML sitemap can be beneficial for SEO, as Google can retrieve essential pages of a website very fast, even if the internal linking of a site isn’t flawless. Here, we’ll explain what they are and how they help you with your rankings.

What are XML sitemaps?

You want Google to crawl every important page of your website. But it can happen pages don’t have any – internal – links to them, which will make them hard to find. You can use an XML sitemap to make sure Google can find and crawl all pages you deem essential on your website. An XML sitemap contains all important pages of a site to help Google determine the structure of it:

XML Sitemap Yoast

The XML sitemap of Yoast.com

 

The XML sitemap above shows the XML sitemap of the Yoast website, which the Yoast SEO plugin created. If you read further down the article, we’ll explain exactly how our plugin helps you create the best XML sitemaps. If you’re not using our plugin, it could be that your own XML sitemap looks a bit different but it will work the same.

As you can see the XML sitemap of Yoast shows several ‘index’ XML sitemaps: …/post-sitemap.xml, …/page-sitemap.xml, …/video-sitemap.xml etc. This categorization makes a site structure as clear as possible. If you click on one of the index XML sitemaps, you’ll see all URLs in that specific sitemap. For example, if you click on ‘…/post-sitemap.xml’ you’ll see all the post URLs of Yoast.com (click on image to enlarge):

XML Post Sitemap Yoast

The post XML sitemap of Yoast.com

 

 

The date at the end of each line tells Google when we’ve last updated the post. This is beneficial for SEO because you want Google to crawl your updated content fast. When a date in the XML sitemap changes, Google knows that there is new content to crawl and index.

Sometimes it’s necessary to split an index XML sitemap because of the number of URLs in it. The limit to the number of URLs in one separate XML sitemap is set to 50.000 URLs. This means, for example, that if your website has over 50.000 posts, you should add two separate XML sitemaps for the post URLs. So, you’re actually adding another index XML sitemap. We’ve set the limit to 1.000 URLs in the Yoast SEO plugin to keep your XML sitemap loading fast.

What websites need an XML sitemap?

If we look at Google’s documentation, they say that XML sitemaps are beneficial for “really large websites”, for “websites with large archives”, for “new websites with just a few external links to it” and for “websites which use rich media content”.

We agree that these types of websites will definitely benefit from having an XML sitemap. However, at Yoast, we think an XML sitemap is beneficial for every website. On each website, you want Google to easily find the most important pages and to know when you’ve last updated those pages. That’s why we’ve added this function to the Yoast SEO plugin. 

Optimize your site for search & social media and keep it optimized with Yoast SEO Premium »

Yoast SEO for WordPress pluginBuy now » Info

Which pages should be in your XML sitemap?

How do you decide which pages you need to include in your XML sitemap? Always start by thinking of the relevancy of a URL: when a visitor lands on a specific URL, is it a good result? Do you want visitors to land on that URL? If not, that URL probably shouldn’t be in your XML sitemap. However, if you really don’t want that URL to show up in the search results of Google you’ll need to add a ‘noindex, follow’ tag. Leaving it out of your XML sitemap doesn’t mean Google won’t index the URL. If Google can find it by following links, Google can index the URL.

Example 1: a starting blog

Let’s take the example of a new blog. The owner wants Google to find the new URLs of the blog fast to make sure his target group can find him in Google. So it’s a good idea to create an XML sitemap right away. The owner has created some describing categories for the first posts and the first posts have been written. The owner has also set up some tags to start with. However, there is not enough content yet to fill the tag overview pages with. Since these tag overview pages contain “thin content”, it’s not valuable to show visitors the tag overview pages yet. It’s, therefore, better to leave the tag URLs out of the XML sitemap for now. In this case, the tag pages could also be set to ‘noindex, follow’ because you don’t want people to land on those URLs from within the search results.

Example 2: media & images

Another example of an unnecessary XML sitemap is the ‘media’ or ‘images’ XML sitemap. Since your images are probably used within your pages and posts, the images are already included in your posts sitemap or your pages sitemap. Adding a separate ‘media’ or ‘images’ XML sitemap would be duplicate. We recommend leaving this one always out of your XML sitemap. Only when images are your main business you can make an exception. When you’re a photographer, for example, you probably do want to show a separate ‘media’ or ‘images’ XML sitemap to Google.

How to make Google find your XML sitemap

If you want Google to find your XML sitemap fast, you have to add it to your Google Search Console account. You can find the sitemaps in Search Console by navigating to ‘Crawl’ and then clicking on ‘Sitemaps’. You’ll immediately see if your XML sitemap is already added to Search Console. If not, click on the ‘Add/Test sitemap’ button which you see on the right of the arrow in the image below.

Google Search Console XML Sitemap Yoast

The XML sitemap of Yoast is added to Google Search Console

 

As you can see in the image, adding your XML sitemap can be helpful to check whether all pages in your sitemap are really indexed by Google. If there is a big difference in the ‘submitted’ and ‘indexed’ number of a certain sitemap, we recommend analyzing this further. Maybe there is an error which prevents some pages from being indexed or maybe you should just add more content or links to the content that’s not indexed yet.

Yoast SEO and XML sitemaps

Because of the importance of XML sitemaps, we’ve added this function to our Yoast SEO plugin. XML sitemaps are available for both the free and the Premium version of the plugin.

Yoast SEO creates an XML sitemap for your website automatically. You can find it by clicking on ‘XML Sitemaps’ in the sidebar of your WordPress install:

Yoast SEO tabs in WordPress backend

The XML Sitemaps tab in Yoast SEO

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the screen that follows you can enable or disable the XML sitemaps of your website. In addition to that, you can click on the ‘XML sitemap’ button to check your XML sitemap in your browser:

XML Sitemap settings in Yoast SEO

XML sitemap settings in Yoast SEO

In the tabs below the ‘enabled’ or ‘disabled’ toggle, you can find the different sitemaps you can in- or exclude from your XML sitemap: Users/Authors, Post Types and Taxonomies. On top of that, you can also exclude specific posts from the XML sitemap if you think the content of that post isn’t valuable enough.

Check out your own XML sitemap!

Now you’ve read this complete post, you know it’s important to have an XML sitemap, because having one can help your site’s SEO. By adding the right URLs to your XML sitemap you make sure Google can easily access your most important pages and posts. In addition to that, Google can also find updated content easily, so they know if a certain URL needs to be crawled again. Lastly, adding your XML sitemap to Google Search Console helps Google find your sitemap fast and, besides that, it allows you to check for sitemap errors to fix.

Now go check your own XML sitemap and see if you’re doing all of this correctly!

Read more: ‘WordPress SEO tutorial: definite guide to higher ranking’ »

SEO New Hampshire

https://twitter.com/andrewraynornh

 

https://plus.google.com/101481704883230173242/

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqysZhClqGBvHY0biNlwfFw

 

https://www.pinterest.com/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.facebook.com/Andrew-Raynor-1694677947484186

 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewraynornh

 

https://about.me/andrewraynor

 

https://myspace.com/andrewraynor

 

https://vimeo.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.crunchbase.com/person/andrew-raynor

 

https://www.reddit.com/user/andrewraynor/

 

https://medium.com/@AndrewRaynor

 

http://andrewraynor.blogspot.com/

 

https://andrewraynoroh.wordpress.com/

 

http://andrewraynor.tumblr.com/

 

https://app.bitly.com/bitlinks/?actions=accountMain

 

https://delicious.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.diigo.com/profile/andrewraynor

 

https://digg.com/u/andrewraynor

 

http://www.folkd.com/user/andrewraynor

 

https://www.instapaper.com/p/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.linkagogo.com/go/Page

 

http://andrewraynor.livejournal.com/

 

https://sites.google.com/site/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.plurk.com/andrewraynor

 

https://getpocket.com/@94aT9A0lg3650p0345d8b95djtpzg653794mvKrd3fT792f3733d9Yf3eHbmYib8

 

http://www.dailymotion.com/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/andrewraynor

 

https://disqus.com/by/andrew_raynor/

 

https://www.readability.com/andrewraynor/

Ask Yoast: Is my site structure too deep?

Andrew Raynor

 

 

If you own a website, you have to think about the structure of your site, whether it’s a blog or a shop. Site structure is essential to help users find their way on your site and it helps your site to rank. So your site’s hierarchy needs to make sense to both users and search engines. When you’re creating one, you might wonder if your structure is too deep or too shallow. Let’s take a look at an example.

Milada Sejnohova, emailed Ask Yoast with the following question:

“How deep can I make the site structure of my blog? Can I make it for instance:

  • Elemis

    • products

      • anti-aging?”

Check out the video or read the answer below!

Learn how to structure your site well with our Site structure training! »

Site structure training$ 99 – Buy now » Info

Depth of your site structure

In the video, I answer Milada’s question:

Well of course you can!

First of all, if you have a products section, then it’s not a blog, it’s a website.

And two, your structure (products and then anti-aging) is a perfectly reasonable way of setting up your site. As long as it’s useful to users and it makes sense, you’re okay. It has to make sense for someone who has never been on your site.

What you really should be thinking about is: if I come to your site and I’m on any page on your site and I know that something should be there, do I know how to get there easily? Because that’s determined in large by your site structure. So make it as easy to understand as possible! 

Good luck!”

Ask Yoast

In the series Ask Yoast we answer SEO questions from followers. Need some advice about SEO? Let us help you out! Send your question to ask@yoast.com.

Read more: ‘The ultimate guide to site structure’ »

SEO New Hampshire

https://twitter.com/andrewraynornh

 

https://plus.google.com/101481704883230173242/

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqysZhClqGBvHY0biNlwfFw

 

https://www.pinterest.com/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.facebook.com/Andrew-Raynor-1694677947484186

 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewraynornh

 

https://about.me/andrewraynor

 

https://myspace.com/andrewraynor

 

https://vimeo.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.crunchbase.com/person/andrew-raynor

 

https://www.reddit.com/user/andrewraynor/

 

https://medium.com/@AndrewRaynor

 

http://andrewraynor.blogspot.com/

 

https://andrewraynoroh.wordpress.com/

 

http://andrewraynor.tumblr.com/

 

https://app.bitly.com/bitlinks/?actions=accountMain

 

https://delicious.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.diigo.com/profile/andrewraynor

 

https://digg.com/u/andrewraynor

 

http://www.folkd.com/user/andrewraynor

 

https://www.instapaper.com/p/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.linkagogo.com/go/Page

 

http://andrewraynor.livejournal.com/

 

https://sites.google.com/site/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.plurk.com/andrewraynor

 

https://getpocket.com/@94aT9A0lg3650p0345d8b95djtpzg653794mvKrd3fT792f3733d9Yf3eHbmYib8

 

http://www.dailymotion.com/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/andrewraynor

 

https://disqus.com/by/andrew_raynor/

 

https://www.readability.com/andrewraynor/

Yes, You Actually Can Make Money off Art

Andrew Raynor

Update: I want to share some good news with you. Last week, my new book Real Artists Don’t Starve debuted on the Wall Street Journal Best Sellers list at #6. Thank you for the support! The best is yet to come.

Since releasing Real Artists Don’t Starve, I’ve heard from a number of people who don’t believe it’s possible to make a living off your creativity — whether in writing, fine art, or another medium. But is that really true?

Yes, You Actually Can Make Money Writing (or Doing Anything Creative)

For most of my life, I was told a story about what it means to be an artist, a title reserved for that elite group of people who were talented but unlikely to succeed. The advice was always the same:

  • Don’t quit your day job.
  • Do this while you’re young.
  • Always have something to fall back on.

When I was growing up, I was told that creativity, though a nice outlet, was never something you should go “all in” on. Because, odds are, you’ll starve. You may have been told the same.

It turns out, though, that’s just not true.

Real artists don’t starve

For years, the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP) has been surveying graduates of arts programs to see how successful they are in the real world.

Approximately 120,000 degrees in the arts are awarded every year, and the question is, what happens to these people? Not what you think.

You might imagine, as I did, the stereotypical starving artist: the stubborn loner struggling to make ends meet and forsaking every adult concern for the sake of their work.

This is what we have been taught to expect when imagining people in full-time, creative careers. We imagine poverty-stricken souls spending their days slaving away at the work, toiling in agony to create their next masterpiece. We picture Michelangelo on his back, nose to ceiling, paint dripping in his eyes, earning little for his genius.

The SNAAP study, however, revealed something quite different. The majority of trained artists are actually thriving. Here were some fascinating statistics:

  • 70% of these graduates have found jobs within the arts,
  • 75% have been or are self-employed,
  • 99% consider creativity to be an important competency in their profession, and

They report income levels that support families, sustain careers, and enable charitable giving. In other words, they are not starving.

Contrast that with a 2014 US Census Bureau where nearly 75 percent of science, tech, engineering, and mathematics graduates are not employed in their field of study, and we are forced to consider a new reality for modern creatives. Many artists are, in fact, not suffering for their craft. They’re proudly producing work that matters and pays the bills.

So we are brought to a sobering conclusion about creative work:

You can make art and make a living.

You don’t have to suffer to create

Over the past couple years, while writing Real Artists Don’t Starve, I interviewed hundreds of working creatives and came across a surprising fact. When we look at the lives of successful artists, writers, and entrepreneurs, we see a unique mindset:

They don’t believe they have to suffer to succeed.

These people, those I call Thriving Artists, think about themselves and their work differently than those who don’t succeed. Discarding the ways of the Starving Artist, they follow a new set of rules, what I call The Rules of the New Renaissance.

Here they are, all 12 of them:

12 Rules 1x

 

Find a way to live off your art

These are the things nobody told me — as a kid drawing cartoons, a teenager playing the guitar, and a twenty-something dreaming of writing books.

In my new book, I share story after story of thriving artists who didn’t suffer for their work but instead found a way to live off it. And if we follow in their footsteps, adopting the rules by which they live their lives, we can do the same.

To learn more about how you can stop starving and join the New Renaissance, check out Real Artists Don’t Starve. If you order the book, you’ll get over $100 in free bonus resources. If you order 3+ more copies, you can get some extra goodies, too.

Click here to download the full-size infographic with the 12 Rules of the New Renaissance.

You can also check out Real Artists Don’t Starve here.

Are you working in your field of study? How can you leverage creativity for your advantage at work? Share in the comments.

Andrew Raynor

How to use Twitter Cards

Andrew Raynor

 

 

Back in 2012, Twitter introduced a system called Twitter Cards which allows site owners to display enhanced tweets on their websites using a syntax very similar to that of OpenGraph. Thanks to this new system, Twitter can show nicer looking tweets, including ones containing media such as images, audio and video.

How does it work?

As mentioned in the introduction, Twitter Cards make use of a very similar syntax to that of OpenGraph. Twitter has some properties that are specific for their platform which you can see in the following snippet:

<meta name="twitter:card" content="summary" />
<meta name="twitter:site" content="@yoast"/>
<meta name="twitter:creator" content="@michielheijmans"/>

The twitter:card property is required and defines the type of card you want to show. You have four flavors here: summary, summary_large_image, app and player. What the difference is between all these different cards can be found in the documentation.

Both twitter:site and twitter:creator are optional and point to the Twitter account of the website publishing the content and the author.

Optimize your site for search & social media and keep it optimized with Yoast SEO Premium »

Yoast SEO for WordPress pluginBuy now » Info

OpenGraph

When it comes to parsing URLs, images and descriptions, Twitter makes use of existing og: properties. You can overwrite these og: properties with Twitter specific ones, but most of the time this isn’t something you’d want. If your goal is to display completely different information on Twitter, then these tags allow you to override default behavior.

There’s one thing to take into account when using both the Twitter and OpenGraph options. Twitter uses name to specify the attribute whereas OpenGraph makes use of the property attribute. Take this into account if you plan on manually implementing Twitter Cards.

Implementing Twitter Cards

As with other meta tags, you need to add the Twitter tags in the <head> of your website and ensure that the values are set properly on a per-page basis. This can quickly becomes an unwieldy task for a blog, so we built a feature that generates the proper meta tags for you.

Twitter Card settings in Yoast SEO

Twitter Card input field in Yoast SEO

Want to change the look of the Twitter Card for a specific post or page? Just use the form on the Social tab. Here you can tweak specific properties to your liking.

Additionally, our Premium plugin contains Social Previews which display what the Twitter Card will eventually look like based on the current page or post:

twitter cards in yoast seo premium

Twitter Card: Preview your Twitter post with Yoast SEO Premium

Twitter Cards are a great (visual) addition and can help increase traffic to your website!

Read more: ‘SEO basics: how to use social media’ »

SEO New Hampshire

https://twitter.com/andrewraynornh

 

https://plus.google.com/101481704883230173242/

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqysZhClqGBvHY0biNlwfFw

 

https://www.pinterest.com/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.facebook.com/Andrew-Raynor-1694677947484186

 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewraynornh

 

https://about.me/andrewraynor

 

https://myspace.com/andrewraynor

 

https://vimeo.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.crunchbase.com/person/andrew-raynor

 

https://www.reddit.com/user/andrewraynor/

 

https://medium.com/@AndrewRaynor

 

http://andrewraynor.blogspot.com/

 

https://andrewraynoroh.wordpress.com/

 

http://andrewraynor.tumblr.com/

 

https://app.bitly.com/bitlinks/?actions=accountMain

 

https://delicious.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.diigo.com/profile/andrewraynor

 

https://digg.com/u/andrewraynor

 

http://www.folkd.com/user/andrewraynor

 

https://www.instapaper.com/p/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.linkagogo.com/go/Page

 

http://andrewraynor.livejournal.com/

 

https://sites.google.com/site/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.plurk.com/andrewraynor

 

https://getpocket.com/@94aT9A0lg3650p0345d8b95djtpzg653794mvKrd3fT792f3733d9Yf3eHbmYib8

 

http://www.dailymotion.com/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/andrewraynor

 

https://disqus.com/by/andrew_raynor/

 

https://www.readability.com/andrewraynor/

5 questions: Talking local SEO with David Mihm

Andrew Raynor

 

 

David Mihm is a local SEO legend. He’s been a leading figure in the SEO world for years. Recently, he started a new firm called Tidings, that helps businesses achieve success in local markets. We’re honored to present you his fantastic answers to five pressing questions on local SEO. Find out what you should focus on if you want to be successful in your area!

Make sure your customers find your shop! Optimize your site with our Local SEO plugin and show you opening hours, locations, map and much more! »

Local SEO for WordPress pluginBuy now » Info

You’ve been in the – local – SEO business for a long time now. You’ve seen many trends come and go, but what was the most striking change you’ve encountered in local SEO in recent years?

Well, I’m going to cheat a little. I’d say there are two very important trends. These are far more important for the average local business than any given algorithm update over which so many SEOs obsess. These are 1) Google’s increased monetization of local SERPs, and 2) Knowledge Panels. I wrote about both of these pretty extensively in my 2017 predictions post.

Google is showing more Adwords than ever above the fold; that won’t be news to anyone. What might be news are some of their hybrid ad/local units. We’re seeing them now in the hotel space and some home services verticals on the U.S. West Coast. Within a couple of years, these hybrid ad formats will roll out to every category, and every geographic market in the world. The availability and visibility of organic inventory will decrease.

In parallel, Google has been moving into a world of answers, not websites. They want to present as much information as they can about a local business directly in the search result. This way the need for searchers to click through to a business’s website will decrease. We’re seeing more and richer information like photos, reviews, busy times, critic lists on which the business is included. There’s also an increase in the ability to transact with the business right from the SERP. Especially in the hospitality, restaurant, and personal care industries. Of course, websites still play a crucial role in helping Google determine the relevance and authority of your business. But you’re going to get fewer clickthroughs from Google. Even if the number of customers they send you remains consistent.

Why is there this distinction between Local SEO and regular SEO? What are the main differences between the two?

There are two prongs to the differences. The first is that since the Venice update in ca. 2011, Google has been localizing organic search results to the geographic area of the searcher. If I search for something like “bankruptcy lawyer,” Google interprets that search as inherently local. I’m looking for a bankruptcy lawyer near me, not in New York or Hong Kong or London. So they sprinkle in websites from local bankruptcy attorneys for this “global” query via some local filter on their traditional algorithm. I didn’t specify “Portland, Oregon” in my search, but Portland bankruptcy lawyers appear right alongside the largest websites in the world like Yelp, Avvo, and Findlaw. Optimizing a website and backlink profile to have a strong local scent is a different skill set than optimizing an eCommerce or media website.

The second prong (one with an even greater difference than traditional SEO) is that there is a fundamentally different algorithm at work that ranks the business listings included in what we call the 3-pack: the visual unit that appears between the ads and organic website results. This algorithm is built largely on ranking factors that aren’t in play for a typical organic market: business listing data, user reviews, proximity to the searcher, and many others.

example of a 3-pack local seo

The 3-pack shown between the ads and organic results after a local search query

 

It’s hard to rank in a neighboring area or town. So what can you do when your business is not close to the center? Or when you live in a small town? Can your business compete with those in a larger city?

It’s going to be hard. You’re probably better off trying to win business on social media than you are in local search at Google — at least for keywords in the major city — in this instance. The best chance you have is to compete organically by targeting specific pages at the larger city. The best/easiest kind of content to populate these pages is usually case studies from customers who live in the larger city.

Beyond that, it’s going to take an overwhelming review profile (as in 10x the number of reviews of the most-reviewed big city competitor) to get noticed in the 3-pack. And that takes a LOT of time and a lot of effort.

So my general advice would be to dominate your small-town market. Get as many customers from your “backyard” as you can. Then start to gradually expand to the bigger city using word-of-mouth, targeted offline business partnerships and referrals, and eventually social media.

Let’s say you have limited resources available to work on your local SEO. You can focus on a maximum of three things. What would you advise?

Glad you asked!  I’ve got a graphical resource which I hope answers this question perfectly 🙂

Thinking about the longest-term benefits for local search, I’d say you should focus first on your website.  Make it mobile-responsive, answer the most common questions your customers have, showcase customer stories and case studies, and make sure you convert people who are already clicking through to it.

Next, I’d focus on building offline relationships in your community (but make sure they’re represented online as well).  Think about relevant non-profits to which you can donate time or money, get involved in community events, and figure out how you can network with and support complementary local businesses to your own.

And then I’d implement a really great review acquisition platform. Getting happy customers to talk about your business on prominent review sites like Google, Yelp, and Facebook is not only an increasingly important ranking factor, but it helps convert prospective customers who see all of your great ratings.

The great thing for local businesses is Local SEO should get less-technical over time. Things like title tags, citations and backlinks are certainly still important, but I see their relative value diminishing as Google collects more and more engagement signals from individual customers.

Today’s marketing landscape seems to revolve in large part around social media. How important is social media for Local SEO? Should every local business have and maintain a Facebook business listing? If so, how?

Social media is important for a holistic digital presence and does have some value for Local SEO. All kinds of studies show that customers are more likely to buy from a business that shows some engagement on social media — an active presence gives people a better feel for your business before they decide to purchase from you.

Every local business should maintain a Facebook business page — not least because Facebook, at some point, will decide to leverage the huge amount of data they have around local businesses and launch a local search engine of their own. You’ll want to have a strong presence out of the gate when that happens.

Beyond that, Facebook pages regularly rank well for your business name, so they’re great for reputation management. And we routinely see Facebook reviews pulled into the Knowledge Panels for local businesses in virtually every industry. So from that standpoint, we know Google is at least able to assess your volume of Facebook reviews (if not the content of the reviews themselves).

(Local businesses should know that unless they pay to Boost or otherwise advertise their Facebook presence, though, very few fans will see it (likely somewhere between 2 – 6%). Helping bridge the gap between expected performance on Facebook and the actual performance of email marketing is the rationale behind my new product, Tidings.)

Read more: ‘Local ranking factors that improve your local SEO’ »

SEO New Hampshire

https://twitter.com/andrewraynornh

 

https://plus.google.com/101481704883230173242/

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqysZhClqGBvHY0biNlwfFw

 

https://www.pinterest.com/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.facebook.com/Andrew-Raynor-1694677947484186

 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewraynornh

 

https://about.me/andrewraynor

 

https://myspace.com/andrewraynor

 

https://vimeo.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.crunchbase.com/person/andrew-raynor

 

https://www.reddit.com/user/andrewraynor/

 

https://medium.com/@AndrewRaynor

 

http://andrewraynor.blogspot.com/

 

https://andrewraynoroh.wordpress.com/

 

http://andrewraynor.tumblr.com/

 

https://app.bitly.com/bitlinks/?actions=accountMain

 

https://delicious.com/andrewraynor

 

https://www.diigo.com/profile/andrewraynor

 

https://digg.com/u/andrewraynor

 

http://www.folkd.com/user/andrewraynor

 

https://www.instapaper.com/p/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.linkagogo.com/go/Page

 

http://andrewraynor.livejournal.com/

 

https://sites.google.com/site/andrewraynornh/

 

https://www.plurk.com/andrewraynor

 

https://getpocket.com/@94aT9A0lg3650p0345d8b95djtpzg653794mvKrd3fT792f3733d9Yf3eHbmYib8

 

http://www.dailymotion.com/AndrewRaynor

 

http://www.stumbleupon.com/stumbler/andrewraynor

 

https://disqus.com/by/andrew_raynor/

 

https://www.readability.com/andrewraynor/